Northern Colorado is known for having beautiful trees that loom over pockets of water and creeks in our semi-arid climate. While the large cottonwood and ash trees are beautiful, some of our most beautiful trees are under attack. Ash trees are incredibly beautiful trees, some of which live for hundreds of years, but not that there is an invasive pest in town, their lifespan may see a decrease.

The Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) is an invasive beetle that originated from a natural range in Russia, China, Japan, and the Koreas. In June of 2002, the first documented case of Emerald Ash Borers was found in the United States, and now they can be found in most parts of the country. 

Because our trees, here in Northern Colorado, are seemingly under attack, a lot of local residents have questions about the EAB and what they can do to minimize the damage caused by this pest. In today’s blog post, we hope to answer a few of the most common questions. 

How Did The EAB Get To Northern Colorado?

While the current cause of the Emerald Ash Borer’s presence is unknown, it has been assumed that the invasive pest found its way to North America via infected ash wood used to pallet and stabilize cargo on trade ships. 

What Happens To Infested Trees?

When an ash tree is infested with Emerald Ash Borers, the canopy of the tree will begin to thin and wither away. This happens because the borers chew into the bark and destroy the trees water and nutrient-rich tissues — cutting the supply of nutrients to the crown or canopy of the tree. Most of the canopy will die within two years of infestation. 

What Do Emerald Ash Borers Look Like?

Adult beetles, the ones that will be flying around in late June are quite noticeable. Per their namesake, they are dark metallic green and are ½ inch-long and ⅛ inch-wide. If you think you have found one, try and catch it. Then send us a picture for identification!

What Do You Do If You Find Emerald Ash Borers?

If you find Emerald Ash Borers on or near your property, be sure to contact us at Schra Tree Care right away. In addition to contacting us, you should also notify your county extension of the Department of Agriculture or contact the USDA Emerald Ash Borer Hotline at (866) 322-4512.


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