The dreaded emerald ash borer has already killed tens of millions of ash trees throughout North America. The destructive pest was first discovered in Colorado in 2013 and continues to get the attention of our Loveland tree service. If you’ve never heard of EAB or know very little about it, we encourage you to check out these blog posts. Our team takes a closer look at how to report the EAB, what caused it to appear in the U.S., why it’s so dangerous and much more. If you believe your tree has been impacted by the emerald ash borer, please don’t hesitate to contact Schra Tree Care.

  1. FAQ About the Emerald Ash Borer In Loveland

    Northern Colorado is known for having beautiful trees that loom over pockets of water and creeks in our semi-arid climate. While the large cottonwood and ash trees are beautiful, some of our most beautiful trees are under attack. Ash trees are incredibly beautiful trees, some of which live for hundr…Read More

  2. The Best Trees to Plant in Place of an Ash Tree

    Our Loveland arborist has talked at length about the Emerald Ash Borer. As a refresher, this beetle is native to Asia and didn’t make its way to North America until the early 2000s. Ever since, the EAB has killed over 50 million ash trees in 29 states. Maybe you recently went to a nursery in searc…Read More

  3. How to Identify an Ash Tree

    It’s only a matter of time until the Emerald Ash Borer rears its ugly head in Northern Colorado. As we’ve mentioned in previous posts, this pest poses a serious threat to local ash trees. But how can you tell if you have this type of tree in your yard? Here are three easy ways to identify an ash…Read More

  4. Frequently Asked Questions About the Emerald Ash Borer

    It’s hard to imagine a small, green jewel beetle being responsible for the destruction of millions of ash trees in the U.S. The Emerald Ash Borer continues to get the attention of arborists throughout Northern Colorado and for good reason. In this post, we thought it would be beneficial to answer …Read More

  5. What Kills the Emerald Ash Borer?

    It seems like the emerald ash borer is being discovered in a new region every month. As of May 2018, the pest has been found in 33 states, as well as the Canadian provinces of Ontario, Quebec, and Manitoba. Since its discovery in 2002, EAB has killed hundreds of millions of ash trees in North Americ…Read More

  6. How to Identify Emerald Ash Borer Damage

    It’s been five years since the Emerald Ash Borer was first discovered in Colorado. This beetle continues to get the attention of homeowners and arborists alike and for good reason. In this post, we thought it would be good to review the signs and symptoms of an EAB attack. Let’s look at some of …Read More

  7. What Caused Emerald Ash Borers to Appear in the U.S.?

    It’s pretty amazing the amount of damage an exotic beetle can cause. Of course, we’re talking about the Emerald Ash Borer. This seemingly innocent insect was first spotted in southeastern Detroit in the summer of 2002. Ever since, the EAB has killed millions of ash trees in North America. In thi…Read More

  8. Does My Tree Have the Emerald Ash Borer?

    In previous blog posts, we’ve explained the ins and outs of the emerald ash borer. This common pest in Northern Colorado may not seem like a nuisance at first glance. However, the small green jewel beetle certainly packs a punch. Native to northeastern Asia, the emerald ash borer feeds on ash tree…Read More

  9. How to Prepare for the Arrival of the Emerald Ash Borer

    The emerald ash borer certainly has the attention of Colorado residents and for good reason. Nearly 15 percent of the trees that make up the state’s urban forest are ash. Can you imagine such a large chunk of our beautiful landscape being wiped away by a beetle? Unfortunately, that’s a real poss…Read More

  10. Why You Should Care About the Emerald Ash Borer

    Ready or not, here it comes. The City of Loveland calls it a “mean, green tree-eating machine.” Homeowners across the U.S. cringe when notified that the beetle has made its way to their state. What we’re talking about is the emerald ash borer. This tiny, metallic-green beetle that has destroye…Read More